Welcome – December 2019

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Latest Newsletter – Typhoon Frieda

 

Click on image to read entire newsletter. We would love to hear your stories about Typhoon Frieda or other memories of growing up the the Seymour area.

We have other stories from former residents who experienced the Typhoon first hand:

Donna White’s Typhoon memory:

Hey Wendy — thank you for sharing your recollection of that fierce night of “weather.”  I, too, was on the road that night.  Dave and I had been out somewhere, and as he drove me home, on the lower road, we were very aware that it was a “windy” night. He dropped me at my house and drove back to Burnaby. Like your parents, mine were sleeping when I got home so I went straight to bed and lay there for a looonng time listening to what I thought was thunder and watching the flashing I thought was lightening. The next morning revealed that the thunder was trees falling and the lightening was power lines going down. Our neighbours had a tree on their roof, but we had no damage other than a few missing shingles on the roof.

I was scheduled to work at Woodward’s – Park Royal – that day, so was driven in by my Dad, only to find there was no power in the whole mall, so it was closed. I remember us then going to Ambleside where logs and debris had washed over the sea wall onto the grass, but not much more. I don’t remember how long we were without power, and certainly did not realize the severity of the storm until days later.

Yes, it was an EVENT.

Michael Thorne’s Typhoon story

Hi — I remember the days immediately before Typhoon Frieda hit, more than the typhoon itself. These had been very windy days. I recall walking through the intersection of Fairway Drive and Caddy Road on the way home from school when a large gust of wind broke a big maple tree branch off and it fell on a hydro pole causing a huge blue electrical flash. However, I slept through the Typhoon itself. which was probably a good thing. 

I was 12 years old, and home alone in our home on Fairway Drive, halfway between Dollar Road and Caddy Road. About 12 trees fell around our house, but somehow none landed directly on it (one fell within 5 meters of my bedroom). My parents were out at a party which they normally considered “not too far away” on Dollarton Hwy, about 4 blocks away.  By the time they realized what was happening, they faced dozens of large trees uprooted and broken, which had fallen across Dollar Road and Fairway, many of those had fallen across power lines which made even climbing through them extremely dangerous.

For my parents it was very dramatic, and they were very concerned for my safety, but as I slept through the whole thing, I didn’t experience any concern. I believe it took them a couple of scary hours to thread their way through the debris to get home, having no idea what they would find when they got there.

As I recall, it took days to get the trees cleared to a point where cars could once again use those streets, and we had no electricity for about a week. Although our home had what was then very modern electric heat which of course didn’t work when the hydro was out, we did have a very efficient fireplace and no shortage of wood to burn, specially after the storm. I suspect cooking was more of a challenge (stove was electric also) but I don’t recall going hungry.

This was a very memorable event, despite having slept through the actual storm.

Please send us your stories about life in the Seymour area in earlier days.

Our newsletters are online – to view our entire collection of newsletters click on RESOURCES tab top right of this screen; and choose NEWSLETTERS from the drop down list. On the Newsletters page, click on the blue text under each heading to open the pdf document which can be read on screen or downloaded and printed.

We have the full index for our first book, Echoes Across the Inlet, published in 1989 online. It is a pdf file that can be read online or downloaded, printed and tucked into your copy of the book.  Click on the BOOKS tab at the top of this screen and choose BOOK INDEX from the drop-down list.

 

We have several books, including our own Echoes Across Seymour and Echoes Across the Inlet for sale in the office. As well we have our neighbour Ralph Drew’s books, Forest & Fjord: The History of Belcarra and Ferries & Fjord: The History of Indian Arm. And we have Deep Cove Heritage tote bags that are roomy and sturdy enough to carry all your books home.

Brief Histories & Indian Arm

4818 - Ralph Drew cropped DSC01023

Former Belcarra Mayor and historian, Ralph Drew has compiled some Brief Histories of Indian Arm. You can find them under the Brief Histories tab at the top of this page.

Indian Arm stretches approximately 20 kilometers (12 miles) north of Burrard Inlet and is part of the Tsleil-Waututh Nation’s traditional territory. Flanked on the east side by Belcarra and the west by the District of North Vancouver. Further north, beyond Silver Falls, it becomes wilderness crown land. The historical Wigwam Inn sits at the north end of the Arm; the building now owned by the Vancouver Yacht Club is used as an outpost for its members.

The Deep Cove Heritage Society’s collections encompass 18-communities — from Maplewood and Mount Seymour, to Deep Cove as well as all of the communities along the west shore of Indian Arm. The east shore, Belcarra, is the home of historian and mayor, Ralph Drew. He is the author of three very comprehensive, award winning books. These are of great interest to us of course, since we share the history of Indian Arm. Information about these books can be found under the Other Local Interest Books tab at top of this page.

Mayor Drew has given us permission to put his Brief Histories on our website (see tab at top of this page) for you to enjoy. We thank him for his generosity.

Following are some items of interest you can do on your computer without leaving home.

Echoes Across Seymour film

South Chair Media has created a wonderful film and we want to share it with you. It’s website states: “For forty years Alex Douglas has lived atop Mount Seymour. An explorer, an educator and an avid outdoorsman, Alex has made a home for himself in one of the last remaining cabins on the mountain. When the resort opened in 1938 local skiers began building cabins to stay in during the winter season. At its peak there were more than 300 cabins on the mountain while today only ten are still standing. Alex’s passion for preserving the history of the mountain permeates every aspect of his life. He spends his days educating the public and exploring the hills for remnants of the forgotten cabins that once dominated the landscape. With a watchful eye and a curious mind, ‘Uncle Al’ has discovered dozens of abandoned cabin sites and put together an impressive collection of artifacts found on his adventures. As he reflects on his life, Alex hopes to inspire a new generation to explore and appreciate the mountain he calls home.”

You are invited to view the film here: Echoes Across Seymour film

Produced By: Geoff Hewat, Gordie Rogers, James Ryan, South Chair Media

Directed By: Gordie Rogers, James Ryan

Cinematography: Geoff Hewat, Gordie Rogers

Uncle Al’s Cabin Tours of Mount Seymour

1880 - First Cabin on 1st LakeDid you know 70 years ago Mt Seymour had a bustling, skiing, hiking, “build it yourself”, shin-digging cabin community of over 200 log cabins!

Come join Alex Douglas (aka Uncle Al), Mt Seymour History Project Archivist, 40 year Mt Seymour Employee, cabin resident and all around mountain man for a hike back in time. Search the forest for cabin sites and remnants, find some that are still standing, and hear amazing stories of fun and ingenuity on the mountain. Photo DCHS #1880 – Donna Leighton’s family’s first Cabin on First Lake, late 1930s.

For more information: Mount Seymour History Project.

Logging Burrard Inlet – 1955

0059 - Log Boom in the Cove

This is an interesting youtube video published by Edward Homer – Logging Burrard Inlet – 1955

We have had a request for information on previous logging operations at Berg’s Landing/Clementine Creek area on Indian Arm. Let us know if you have any information or suggestions on who we might contact. Email to deepcoveheritage@gmail.com

Photo at left is DCHS #0059 showing a log boom in Deep Cove in the early 1900s. Photo courtesy of Mr. & Mrs. John Moore (click on photo to enlarge).

 

Blair Rifle Range

Blair Range plaque webDonna Sacuto unveiled the plaque that has been installed on Mount Seymour Parkway to recognize the history of the Blair Rifle Range.

The plaque is the result of a research paper that Donna wrote. You can read the paper by clicking here.

 

 

 

Book and the Ferries of Indian Arm video

Ferries & Fjord - Front CoverOur friend and neighbour, Mayor Ralph Drew of Belcarra, has written four impressive books – Forest & Fjord: The History of Belcarra (pub. 2013, 536 pages) and Ferries & Fjord: The History of Indian Arm, its Ferries & Docks, Travelling Post Offices & Floating Grocery Stores (pub 2015, 372 pages), Townsite Tales: The History of Ioco, Anmore Valley & North Shore of Port Moody Arm (pub 2017, 348 pages), and Coquitlam Chronicles: Historical Crossroads on the Fraser River (pub 2018, 370 pages). These books are available from the author as well as from our office.

Mayor Drew was the guest speaker at a Deep Cove Heritage meeting and, as well, was a commentator on our tours up Indian Arm last year and he will be onboard with us again this year.

He recently gave a talk to the Vancouver Historical Society and we thank the Society and Mayor Ralph Drew for allowing us to post the link of that talk here.

Click on this link to view the video:  The Ferries of Indian Arm video

Ross Regan’s Cabin building 

4793-30a - Ross Regan- Bill- Greg Prothman- 1948Deep Cove Heritage member Ross Regan built his cabin on Mount Seymour in 1948. You can hear Ross’ commentary and watch it being built with this wonderful series of photos.

Click here to watch Ross Regan’s Cabin constructed

Click on photo at left to enlarge. DCHS #4793 – Building Gods Lil Acre, Mount Seymour Ski Cabin, 1948. Photo courtesy Ross Regan.

We have over 1400 heritage photos online for viewing

Camera graphicClicking the camera graphic at left will take you to explore Random Images – you can easily do searches by clicking the tabs under the Deep Cove Heritage banner. More photos will be online soon!

Volunteers are still needed!

 

Call for Action to Members and the Community:

Deep Cove Heritage Society needs your help and support in preserving our rich history of Deep Cove and the surrounding area of Seymour.

The DCHS was established first and foremost for the public, be it general interest or research purposes. It was established in 1985 by a dedicated group of volunteers, many of whom are still with us today. The Heritage would not be able to survive without it’s volunteers.

We are calling on the next generation to volunteer their time in order to keep the Heritage going.

It is a great way to connect to the community and learn about our local history.

There are many volunteer opportunities at hand. Call us at 604-929-5744, or drop by our office at 4360 Gallant Avenue (inside the Deep Cove Cultural Centre.)

 

The Deep Cove Heritage Society office is located in the Deep Cove Cultural Centre.

4360 Gallant Avenue (at Panorama Drive) in North Vancouver, BC V7G 1L2

Echoes Across Seymour and Echoes Across the Inlet book information – click on “Books” at top of this page.

WINTER HOURS OPEN: Tues & Thurs 10am-4pm; Wed, Fri, Sat & Sun 1pm-4pm; Closed Mondays 1pm-4pm Other times when volunteers available Please phone to confirm hours before driving out
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
- Liz Jenkins Bollmann – President
- Vickie Boughen – Vice President
- Louise Hart – Treasurer/Secretary
- Marilyn Myers – Director
- Eileen Smith - Director
- Tom Kirk - Director
- Alex Douglas - Director
OFFICE

- Jim Slight - Co-ordinator
- Mechtild Morin
ARCHIVAL PROJECT

- Hope Morris
- Vickie Boughen
- Liz Jenkins Bollmann
DISPLAYS & WRITING
- Wendy Bullen Stephenson
Slideshow